Apocalypse

Apocalypse

Materials:

Metal

Story

The metal sculpture, located at the entrance of the Kamei National Forest Park, is part of the series Apocalypse. The series consists of hundreds of stones the artist has collected from all over the world since 2016. Displayed here is a reproduction of one of the molten rocks on the uneven and coarse stone façade in the park along the walkway. Portraits, like rocks, embody the human spirit, morality, faith, destiny and the intrinsic nature of all human beings. Their different sizes, shapes, colours and textures suggest the individuality of each human life, which emerges from blending and clashing their original function and state with the various worlds and locales, races and identities, past and future. Shaped by time and their own fundamental vitality and power, the selected stones are informative of the negotiation between natural and man-made realities. Throughout the years, he has collected hundreds of stones from all over the world. These rocks are like portraits, which embody the human spirit, morality, faith, destiny and the intrinsic nature of all human beings. These stones, differing in sizes, shapes, colours and textures, resemble human lives: they both come from various worlds and locales, races and identities, past and future. Their own intrinsic nature and values, such as the sacred, the noble, the ugly, the evil. They blend and clash with each other. They are shaped by time and their own a fundamental vitality and power. ภาษาไทย : คลิกที่นี่

Wang

Wang Sishun

China

Wang Sishun, born in Hubei, China in 1979, lives and works in Beijing. In 2008 he completed his Master at the Fine Arts Sculpture department at Central Academy of Fine Arts. He works in a diverse range of media from sculpture to installation. Engaging with the concept of transformation, he rethinks objects and materials to create alternative narratives.

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